nancy-jainchill

nancy-jainchill

nancy-jainchill

Nancy Jainchill describes herself as a born again writer. A long time ago, when she was maybe nine years old and sitting at the radiator in her bedroom—one of those old NYC apartment radiator boxes that clunked and thunked when the heat went on or off—she was a reporter covering world events while sitting there. Years later, coming of age in the 1960s and ‘70s, once in a while she’d write poetry or a story about one of her dogs, but ultimately gave up on writing. Fast forward to 9/11, back living in NYC, witness to the empty fire trucks serving as funeral caissons making their way through the city streets, and hearing the sounds of mourning and fear, her return to writing began. In June 2013 Nancy received an MFA from the Bennington College Writing Seminars program, the last in a long line of degrees she’s procured—including an MA in Women’s Studies and a PhD in Psychology. The MFA made her realize she’d come home. Her feminism and activist roots are at the heart of her in-process memoir and other writing. Naïve as she thinks it may sound, Nancy’s always felt a responsibility to change the world, and describes herself as an armchair revolutionary. A practicing psychologist, she lives mostly in Woodstock, NY with her husband, two dogs, and assorted wildlife, depending upon the season. Of late, she has reconnected with her activist beginnings and was spotted crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge for the 50th commemoration of the Selma-Montgomery March. Nancy Jainchill has been published in Every Father’s Daughter (ed., Margaret McMullan, 2015), The Dr. T.J. Eckleburg Review, Calyx, Free State Review, Entropy and The Woodstock Times. She’s also read on NPR and has been interviewed by Martha Frankel on Woodstock Booktalk Radio. In an earlier life she published extensively in the field of treatment for adolescent drug use and abuse.

Portraits: Franco Vogt